Brendan “Weimy” Weimholt
Weimy

6 Platoons at SEAL Team 3 and 5, First Phase Buds Instructor, Sniper school course manager, Senior Enlisted Advisor for Orientation at Buds.

Sniper in “Act of Valor” movie

Awards 2 BVs, PH, ARCOM w/V

Founder and owner of Weimy Cutlery- Hand forged kitchen and outdoor knives.

Wife Shannon and three kids- Jacy(daughter-22) Trevor(son-18) James(son-9)

Born and raised in the Mojave Desert in CA, Live in DFW, TX now.

20 years in Navy, Retired Senior Chief December 2017

Sonny Manson (-Retired-):Sonny at the Ride 2017

EOD Technician @ EOD Mobile Unit 2.
-BUD/S Class 221
-SEAL TEAM 4, 10 and 7.

McB:McB

McB as he is called is a highly decorated combat veteran, Navy SEAL and diversely skilled operator. As a SEAL platoon operator and leader, he has deployed multiple times into combat zones in four U.S Op­erational Theaters. With a 24-year career as a United States Navy SEAL, he has operated and trained with; SEAL Team One, SEAL Team Two, SEAL Team Three, SEAL Team Four and SEAL Team Eight. While McB has had a success­ful Navy career, he is also an award-winning photographer, videographer and a well-versed speaker. His message is not only motivational on a corporate level, but also promotes indi­vidual and personal growth and responsibility. This multi-media presentation will highlight the “NEVER QUIT Attitude” which make Navy SEALs successful and share the defining character­istics that promote leadership in a SEAL platoon.

Douglas “Mike” DayMike Day

Senior Chief Petty Officer Special Operator SEAL, Douglas “Mike” Day, entered a tiny room in a raid on high-level al Qaeda militants in Iraq’s Anbar province on, April 6, 2007, a bullet slammed into his body armor from less than 10 feet away.

By the time it was over, Day had been shot 16 times from a distance of within 10 feet, not counting the 11 rounds stopped by his body armor. He also suffered grenade shrapnel wounds that knocked him unconscious.

Before the firefight was over, a fellow SEAL was killed by a gunshot wound to the neck, yet Day was miraculously able to walk to the medevac helicopter on his own two feet. He spent the next two years recovering from his injuries, and still suffers lingering pain on a daily basis.

Retired from the Navy, Day now works as a full-time advocate for wounded veterans and their families.

“Despite multiple gunshot wounds, he continued to engage the enemy, transitioning to his pistol after the loss of his primary weapon, eliminating three enemy personnel without injury to the women and children in close proximity to the enemy personnel. Additionally, his decisive leadership and mental clarity in the face of his injuries ensured the success of the mission which resulted in the destruction of four enemy personnel and the recovery of sensitive United States military equipment and valuable intelligence concerning enemy activity in the area.”